google semantic

Google wants semantic copy

As each second passes and even as I write this article, Google is learning and growing. Since the addition of RankBrain in late 2015, Google wants even more to think like humans and deliver more intuitive search results.

RankBrain is the machine learning AI integrated with Google search that helps to deliver content from across the web that is more beneficial to users.

Google considers RankBrain to be their 3rd most important ranking factor when it comes to their 200+ ranking factors for search. So what does this mean? Essentially, RankBrain is helping to deliver content that we want even though as a user we might not ask for it using specific keywords. This addition to Google is allowing the world’s favorite search engine to think semantically.

For example, take the snippets that appear at the top of Google search results when you ask a question. Google interprets that you’ve asked a question, then it presents the answer, along with a link to continue reading more information. Take the search below:

google semantic search snippet

I didn’t search for information on Lee Harvey Oswald. I searched for who shot JFK. Likewise, the following 10 search results deliver information rich with keywords like “assassination” & “conspiracy theories”, as well as rich media results linking to video interviews on the subject. NOTE: I recently read 11/22/63 by Stephen King and happened to have this topic on my mind. Great read by the way…

So what’s the takeaway here?

Google wants your website copy to be natural. Semantic. You ask Google questions every day and it wants to deliver real answers. Sure, you can continue writing copy like this:

Our company, XYZ Super Sprockets, sells the best green biodegradable bags around. So, if you’re looking for green biodegradable bags, then you’ve come to the right place. Many of our current customers can’t get enough of our green biodegradable bags, which means that you’ll love them too…

Or, you could right real copy that people care about. It’s not enough to fill your copy with keywords. You have to deliver a content experience that makes them want to keep consuming your content. If they found you because of your keyword rich copy, but just go back to Google search results and check out another site, then what good is that?

Put yourself in your customer’s shoes. Would you want to read that sample copy above? No, and you should expect your customers to either.

Looking for help with your website and your content? Market House can help.

Jason Marlowe

Husband. Dad. Marketing Pro. Data Nerd. Graphic & Web Designer. BBQ & Sweet Tea Connoisseur. Amateur Woodworker. DIY Hero.

All stories by: Jason Marlowe

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